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The Task Master works out different tasks to be performed by the competitors. All tasks must be designed to test the flying abilities and skills of all pilots fairly and most importantly safely. Therefore, they must be an experienced pilot themselves and they must be familiar with the flying site.

Tasks should stress "Flying Ability" as opposed to "Landing ability". Tasks should be designed to test a pilot's ability to use both ridge and thermal lift and their ability to perform predetermined skills, including Cross country tasks into the wind or cross wind, identify or correctly photograph distance pylons or turn points.

When possible, alternative tasks and start formats should be prepared to account for extenuating circumstances or inclement weather, however to ensure competitors fly in the same air conditions it is necessary to ensure all pilots launch or enter a race within a strictly limited time period - usually between 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

To count as a championship task all competitors in the class shall have the opportunity of having at least one competition flight in time to carry out the task.

If a championship is held in more than one class, each class shall be regarded as a championship in its own right and the organizers must, as far as possible, avoid interference of one class by another.

Cross country races have proven to be the best overall test of pilot soaring skills. The Task Master must select a number of suitable sites facing into various prevailing wind directions. A variety of tasks for each site will allow for varying wind directions and atmospheric instability. Task can range from long distance triangles to short races to goal.

Task Masters

Task Masters should provide encouragment to pilots who are new to the area, to competitions or cross country flying by ensuring the first Task leg is:

  • down wind, or
  • along a ridge facing the prevailing wind if possible, or
  • along any route which promises a high completion rate of the primary leg. (Sending a first Task leg into any significant head wind is discouraging to entrant level competitors at a time when they are most exited about participating.)
and by
  • Providing a familiarization lecture for each Task route, the conditions and hazards expected en route.
  • Establishing a "Buddy" or coach system to train pilots.

Task Masters must simultaneously design tasks to challenge experienced competitors - especially those with international ambitions. The HPAC supports and encourages FAI Badge and Record attempts. Tasks which comply with FAI Badge and Record distance requirements provide additional challenges to competition pilots:

Pilots who have paid their FAI Badge and Record fee may make attempts on National and International records when tasks meet record requirements. (Barographs are not required for several tasks which take place in a competition.)

Pilots with or without FAI Badge and Record documentation will be able to judge their racing skills against National and World records set by top caliber pilots.

The FAI Sporting Code Section 7 Hang Gliders Class 0 section 2.6 states: A sporting license is not required for badge flights.

NOTE: Event officials may be given temporary Observer status for the duration of the event in order to expedite FAI Badge and Record attempts.

Task validity

Task validity is secured by:

  • Ensuring 20% of the competitors can complete 20% of the total task distance or other approved validity formula;
  • Establishing attainable minimum distances;
  • Placing large tarps (in specified shapes as an example) for competitors to identify;
  • Using photographic evidence for air starts or designated turn points for each Task set each day including:
    • Task (day) Board
    • Their air start (if soaring an air start time it is permissible to use an Air Clock)
    • All designated task turn points
    • The race finish clock if used (and numbered glider for record claims)

All film becomes the property of the event organizers.

Fixed focal length lens and 35 mm Film only.

The organizers may choose to develop the films of only those pilots who have finished above a specified cut position.

Normally all film of this finish group is turned in at the end of the second last day of the event for developing. For high calibre meets the film will be required daily.

No competitor may take off during a competition day from the competition site without the permission of the Director.

Permission may be given for test flying however, if the task for that class has started the pilot must land after the test flight and make a competition take-off on the task.

The task for each class may be different and a task may be set for one class only.

A competitor is permitted more than one start for a task if so stated in the local regulations.

The competitor must have landed in a designated bomb out field and must relaunch within the specified launch window.

The Director shall state at briefing the times at which takeoffs start and turn points and any finish line closes.

If the start is delayed all given times will be delayed by corresponding amounts.

The closing time (last landing time) for tasks is sunset plus 30 minutes unless all competitors have already landed.

Suspension or cancellation of a task.

The Director may cancel a task before any competitor has taken off if the weather becomes unsuitable.

The Director has the power to suspend or cancel a task after some or all pilots have taken off only in an emergency resulting from hazardous weather or other conditions which could not be avoided by the pilots and which would endanger their safety.

If flying is suspended only for a short period the Director need not cancel the task.

Information on how any cancellation would be announced shall be stated in the local regulations.

Tasks

The Director may give alternative tasks at briefing for use if the weather deteriorates, but may not change the task once flying has started.

A task from the following list shall be set on each flying day:

  • Distance, straight or via one or more turn points. The direction in which a straight distance flight shall be flown may be designated.
  • Area distance. Distance within a set area bounded by 4-10 turn points which may be turned in any order except that a return to the point immediately preceding the last turn point is prohibited, or in which a turn point may be used only once.
  • Distance out-and-return via one turn point or one of several turn points within a 30 degree sector.
  • Speed to goal either straight or via one or more turn points or speed around a closed circuit course.
  • Race over a designated course.
  • Speed around a closed circuit course followed by distance either around the same course or in a straight line.
  • Duration via one or more turn points with landing at goal.

The organizers may propose additional tasks at the time of making their bid for the championships provided they have satisfactory experience of the new task(s) in national championships.

The task for each class may be different and a task may be set for one class only.

Task Masters must recognize and encourage pilots who are new to competitions and / or cross country flying by:

Ensuring the first Task leg is down wind or along a ridge facing the prevailing wind if possible or along any route which promises a high completion rate of the primary leg.

(Sending the first leg of Task into a significant head wind is discouraging to entrant level competitors at a time when they are most exited about participating.)

Providing a familiarization lecture for each Task route, the conditions and hazards expected en route.

May 28 2012   Top Top