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Event Organizer and Participant Support - Updated March 22nd 2012

 
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Fred Wilson
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Joined: 10 Dec 2014
Posts: 45
PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 02:58 am    Post subject: Event Organizer and Participant Support - Updated March 22nd 2012 Reply with quote

The Event scene here in Canada is in a sorry state of affairs. Our association and clubs leadership could be key to reinvigorating it.

We have many events that struggle (even some with little or no entry fee.) This discourages organizers.

Yet we also have Events that are doing so well they reinvigorate their organizers each and every year.
Examples: Quebec Events, the WCSC BFAR and the Invermere BC Lakeside Event.

What are their secrets of success? Please share your thoughts with us here.
_______________________________________

1. Event organizer Support and assistance. See:
. .a) The meet organizer assistance package

. .b) Organizing an Event

. .c) HPAC Event Planning and Forms

2. Event Organization and Management Critique (FAI Cat 2 Steward) Report:
This is the document to use to assist novice Event Organizational Teams:
A step by step, day by day critical analysis of the success, failures and innovations of the Event Organization and Team.
During the organizational period of the event, meet regularly to address progress.
- During the event, there should be a short meeting every morning or evening to go over updates to this.

There is no such thing as a steward for Cat 2 events except for Pre-Category 1 events, where the Steward is required to be there.

At Cat 1 Events the ONLY ones that see this are the FAI HQ, their Lawyer and the Executive of the CIVL Bureau.

At Cat 2 Events the Steward processes the document BUT meets with the org team ± every day, progressively more so as the meet day approaches and lets them see the FULL doc and critique.

3. A a key factor is early publication of the Event.
This ensures that pilots who MUST lock in their holidays early in the new year can do so.
Our National Associations have Nationals Bids Deadlines for a reason. (The HPAC's Nationals Bid deadline is "December 1st to be awarded by January 10th.")
Competition organizers fought for this as it was vital to maximizing registration numbers.
- Overseas, events announced a year in advance are seeing all available slots filled within a very short period of time.

4. An informative website with good visual appeal and regular news feeds will attract the attention of pilots. See this resource.

5. A top notch Local Rules Document should be there the day the website goes up. These are now standardized in a logically ordered format so pilots can quickly find the exact information they are after.
Standardization has also dramatically cut down on translation issues - you can expect considerable numbers of pilots to arrive with little or no English language skills. Your local rules can be key to your Event's success.
Write them with the intention of covering most if not all anticipated eventualities. This will buy you precious time during the Event. Copy the best version(s) you can find on line like the CIVL's here.

Category 1 Local Rules are written for very experienced competition pilots. Category 2 Local Rules (See here) on the other hand are in some ways better as you are providing Information
for less experienced pilots who may be unfamiliar with the area or expected conditions. Including Site Guides and Flying Area and routes information will bring success in the form of in increased numbers of pilot entries.
Question: What % of available slots must be allocated to foreign pilots in order to obtain Cat 2 Sanctioning? Shocked ?


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Fred Wilson
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Posts: 45
PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 02:59 am    Post subject: Foreign Sucesses. Updated Dec 24th 2012 Reply with quote

By comparison: the overseas competition scene in New Zealand and Australian are strong.

Secondly: New European competition organizations with built in scoring and support systems are sprouting like weeds.
Roaring successes we are just now starting to take advantage of with the HPAC's XC League supplied and supported by XContest http://www.xcontest.org/canada/en/

Examples:

1. The Paragliding World Cup (which built its success around a system less all the FAI / CIVL Cat 1 headaches and expenses.)

Update:
2. BHPA British Club Challenge (British Hangliding and Paragliding Association.)
FLYBBC Forum: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FLYBCC/messages

3. FAST Retrieve
FAST Retrieve was first developed to try and reduce the workload on the organisation staff during the retrieval stages of the British Championships at St André in 2007.
It began as a way of reducing the paperwork and the time involved in checking who was still 'at large' and has since evolved into a complete messaging and monitoring system specifically developed for retrieving competitors quickly.

At the heart of the system is a bespoke SMS messaging server which accepts incoming messages from Competitors, decodes and extracts the required co-ordinates and feeds the information to the relevant parts of the system to indicate competitor status and position on a map.
Competitors are tracked from first requesting a retrieve through collection by a vehicle and all the way up to final check in back at the base. cont...

4. . XContest (Hang Gliding and Paragliding) with their built in Nationals (and Regional) Competitions while also supporting Fly-In XC XCamp Events all with Scoring provided.

5. . XC Open (Paragliding) with their XC Open Worlds and XC-Camp XC Fly-In style Event all using the Scoring Programs provided by XC Open.

6. For Paragliding Accuracy, SIV and Aerobatics events see: http://www.hpac.ca/forum/viewtopic.php?t=477


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Fred Wilson
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 02:59 am    Post subject: Assigned Area Tasks (AAT) - Updated Nov. 8th 2011 Reply with quote

Assigned Area Tasks (AAT) totally re-invigorated the sail plane competition scene a decade or so ago.
Our sports is just now starting to adopt this highly appealing competition format, which has an excellent history of inspiring novice competitors.

SeeYou and Area Tasks (AT) Software at: OzGAP 2005 and Assigned Area Tasks

See: XContest Assigned Area Tasks (AAT) and http://www.xcontest.org/xrace/rules/

More information on Assigned Area Task Competitions (AAT) at: http://ozreport.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=21610

Large area tasks can be very confusing, even to the experts.
Example: Understanding the Task Objectives (PDF)

An introduction to Assigned Area Tasks: http://www.soaringpilot.org/dokuwiki/doku.php/soarpilot/assigned_area_tasks
From: Doug Jacobs Contest presentations: http://www.dragonnorth.com/djpresentations/ (Enough reading here alone to fill an entire winter!)

See the British Gliding Competition Rule Book (PDF) (Sail Planes are at least a decade ahead of us in the competition format scene.)


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Fred Wilson
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 02:59 am    Post subject: Airspace Kmz files. Reply with quote

Clubs could support regional events by posting kmz files of:

a) The Launch Sites, Landing Fields and "Do Not Land Here" areas;
b) Typical Competition Race routes and their turnpoints;
c) Typical Competition Assigned Area Tasks (AAT);
d) Proof reading the Canadian Airspace kmz file for their region. http://www.lloydbailey.net/airspace.html (Thanks to the WCSC's guru: Chiumanfu!)
Click the map to download airspace files viewable on Google earth, to download the kmz file, click next on the Google Earth popup.


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Fred Wilson
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Posts: 45
PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 03:00 am    Post subject: Weather Resources. Reply with quote

Weather Resources.

Check out this great site: It offers lots of different graphs & data and a very intuitive interface.
See: http://weatherspark.com/

The HPAC or Provincial Associations should encourage someone to create RASP Website pages for all of our major competition areas.
This would useful to pilots who are intensively into weather analysis.

WCSC Example see: http://www.chiumanfu.com/RASP/univiewer.html

Yes, products like http://www.xcskies.com/ are out there, but:
There is a reason the Big Gun event's "Weather Gurus" also use the likes of Dr Jack's RASP and BlipMap information.

1. Tremendous Weather Resource here.

2. Environment Canada Weather and Meteorology Information

3. A Simple Guide To Understanding Skew-T Diagrams etc from http://www.theweatherprediction.com/

4. Haby's Weather Forecasting Hints

5. K Index and Lifted Index for Soaring Forecasts

6. Competition Weather Forecasting here.


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Fred Wilson
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Posts: 45
PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 03:01 am    Post subject: Event Software - Updated Dec 26'th 2013 Reply with quote

Event organizer assistance links - Updated Dec 26'th 2013

HPAC Event Planning and Forms

The meet organizer assistance package

Organizing an Event
_____________________________________

One Pilot’s Ideas for Improving Hang Gliding Competitions.
_____________________________________

FAI / CIVL Appoved Software for Online Contest Systems

. a) NavITar SeeYou Competition Software - their Pilot User Version is here.

. b) Davis Straub's Scoring Program and Manual (version 1.60)

AAT (Assigned Area Tasks) - the future for our Comp scene?
- AAT Oz GAP scoring script for SeeYou

. c) The Tennessee Tree Toppers (TTT) Automated scoring for local contests

FAI Sporting Code General Section

. d) FAI / CIVL Competition Regulations Section 7A Hang Gliding (PDF) and Section 7B Paragliding (PDF)

. e) FAI / CIVL Section 7A Aerobatics (PDF)
. . - Aerobatics in Hang Gliders: Understanding Operating Limitations. (9 page article by Wills Wing.)

. f) FAI Aerobatics Commission Documents

. g) Paragliding Forum discussions on Acro and SIV Manoevers

. h) FAI / CIVL Section 7C Sporting Code Paragliding Accuracy Events (PDF)

. i) Paragliding World Cup Rules

. j) XC Open Event Rules
. . . - Pilot's Guide for XC-Open Comps

. k) XCountry.org and their Hang Gliding and Paragliding Cross Country Rules - including Assigned Area Tasks (AAT)

. L) British Hang Gliding Competitions web site. Welcome to GOAL!

UPDATE Dec 23'd 2012:
. M) Validating track logs: http://ozreport.com/1356112515

Ian Jarman, Past HGFA Australia Administrator wrote:
"International standardisation should be a CIVL/FAI goal. Reinventing something that already exists to an acceptable standard is a waste of our already scant time and manpower resources."


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Fred Wilson
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 03:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Updated Aug 19th, 2012

A Beginners Introduction into Competition Soaring.

See article at: http://www.esparacing.com/sport_pilot/comp_soaring.htm

Then read: http://www.gfa.org.au/imis15/GFA/Sports_Content/Further___Faster.aspx

Flying In Paraglider Competitions By Tim O’Neill

Soaring Techniques

Tnx to the Sail Plane Gurus.

Cross Country Coaching Manuals

Cross Country Clinic Course Outline

Cross Country Paragliding Competitions by Tom Payne: How to Get a Perfect Start

Cross Country Paragliding Competitions by Tom Payne: Tactics

Cross Country Paragliding Competitions by Tom Payne: A Task Setting Philosophy

Cross Country Safety Safety Tips for our favorite pastime. Includes: Competition and XC Planning Tips

Best Glide and Speed to Fly for Paraglider Pilots

Speed to Fly and the McReady Theory

The Bottom Line On Speed-To-Fly for Hang Gliders and Paragliders

Mads Syndergaard mentioned he was writing a book on competition paragliding. It's out now:

Flying Rags for Glory: a Guide to Competition Paragliding at XCShop.com Exerpts are now posted for browsing.


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Fred Wilson
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 03:39 am    Post subject: Foreign Events: for Comparison Purposes Reply with quote

Foreign Events: for Comparison Purposes

Tennessee Tree Toppers Team Challenge is designed to help pilots learn about cross country flying, mountain launching technique, team flying and more. There is simply no other place that you can learn this much at any other place in the world in such a short amount of time.

More info at: http://ozreport.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=22651

The USHPA Foundation For Free Flight


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Fred Wilson
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 03:40 am    Post subject: Resources Reply with quote

The FAI Hang Gliding and Paragliding Commission (CIVL)

List of National Associations

CIVL's Subcommittees, Working Groups and Technical Officers

CIVL's Competition Information and Resources.

CIVL's CIVL World Ranking System (WPRS) - Information and how to get a CIVL WPRS ID
See: http://civlrankings.fai.org/

CIVL's International Pilot Proficiency Information (IPPI) Card

Ian Jarman, Past Executive Officer HGFA Australia wrote in 1995 wrote:
"International standardisation should be a CIVL/FAI goal.
Reinventing something that already exists to an acceptable standard is a waste of our already scant time and manpower resources.""

Ian Jarman, administrateur australien de la HGFA dans 1995 wrote:
"La standardisation internationale devrait être un des buts de la CIVL/FAI.
Réinventer quelque chose qui existe déjà à un niveau acceptable est une perte de notre temps et de nos ressources humaines."

FAI / CIVL Sporing Licenses

Nicole McLearn wrote:
If you want any comps you go to to count for FAI WPRS points, you'll need a sporting license.
See: http://www.hpac.ca/forms/FAISportingLicenceApp.pdf

Send the form plus payment in to Suzanne at the Aero Club of Canada and she'll mail out a wallet card.
FYI, there is a new email address for the Aero Club of Canada - info@aeroclubofcanada.ca

Their old address may still be on the application form you download, so if you need to email them with any questions please use the new address listed above.

It's NOT mandatory to get this license, but some organizers may require it (you'll have to ask depending on which comps you attend)
and it's necessary if you want WPRS Points (which are required if you ever want to go to a FAI Worlds, Europeans, Pan-Asians, etc).

Pilots who need a valid CIVL ID should see: http://civlrankings.fai.org/?a=308
If not registered yet, please register at: http://civlrankings.fai.org/FL.aspx?a=332
via http://civlrankings.fai.org

Due to the holiday season coming up, the mail may get slowed down and the Aero Club of Canada office may be closed between Christmas and New Years.
If you are planning on attending a comp in January (eg. Colombia Open, Superfinal, Monarca, Forbes Worlds, etc)
I'd recommend getting this done sooner rather than later, as if you wait too long, the license won't show up in the mail until after you leave.


Nicole


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Fred Wilson
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Joined: 10 Dec 2014
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 05:34 am    Post subject: Waypoint Planner Upgrade + XC Planner and their Manuals Reply with quote

Waypoint Planner Upgrade + XC Planner and their Manuals
_______________________________________________

Tom Paynes Waypoint Planner has just been Upgraded,
See: http://www.paraglidingforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=36354

Waypoint Planner User Manual: http://www.paraglidingforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=34143

- targeting online XC league supporting organizations like Leonardo and
XC Contest National and Regional XC Leagues via its National XContest and
XC Camp Fly-In Features

See: http://www.paraglidingforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=36354

Also Tom Paynes's XC Planner (Routes and Distances) http://xcplanner.appspot.com/

XC Planner User Manual http://www.paraglidingforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=24141
_______________________________________________

PS:
Follow the list of Nations that are being added to XC Contest XC Leagues here.
_______________________________________________

Read: Cross Country Coaching Manuals


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Fred Wilson
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Obtaining additional Radio Frequencies for Team Use during Aviation Competition Events.

Message from Spectrum Management

Please contact the Industry Canada office nearest to where the Aviation Competition event will be taking place for assistance.
To determine that, please consult Radiocommunication Information Circular 66, Addresses and Telephone Numbers of
Regional and District Offices (RIC-66), http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf01742.html
found on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website of Industry Canada.

This in response to the question
Re: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf02129.html

1. Is it possible to apply for additional Airband Radio Channels for Team Use during Aviation Competition Events?

Hang Gliding (and Paragliding) is allocated 123.400 in Canada,
but large groups of pilots and their ground chase crews ie at a major competition would overwhelm one frequency.
To ensure event safety, a selection of channels that can be allocated to teams would free up one, ie: 123.400 for Event Safety Management.

2. What can be done to obtain channels for Foreign pilots whose National Governments mandate that they use different radio types.

Example:
USA hang glider and paraglider pilots are required by US law to use the following frequencies (and radio type) in the USA, and thus do not own Aircraft Radios.
Reference: http://www.ushpa.aero/hndbook.asp#RADIOAUTHORIZATIONS
"Pilot and Rogallo Members of the USHPA may be authorized to use or designate use of type accepted radio equipment on the frequencies of 151.625 MHz, 151.955 MHz, 151.505 MHz, 158.4 MHz or 151.925 MHz, (or call WPRY420) for the purpose of conducting USHPA business, cross-country meets, events and retrievals."

Other nationalities use other Radio Types.
Example HGFA Australia (Pff) who use UHF

I will update here what the possibilities are (and if there are any costs associated with this.
Years ago I recall that additional Airband frequencies were easily obtainable at no cost.)
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Fred Wilson
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 07:51 pm    Post subject: Wind Tech Manual Reply with quote

Wind Technician Manual

skydawg wrote:
What do you need "wind techs" doing?

Being a Wind Dummie is not being a Wind Teck.
Memorable stuff! Very Happy Here is my Wind Tecnician Briefing:

Being a Wind Teck is some of the most fun, interesting and educational flying you will ever do.
It is a terrific learning environment.

Part 1:
The Weather forcast used by Task Committees derives from Atmospheric Soundings taken usually twice a day, early morning and late afternoon.
So Wind Tecks are providing up to the minute weather information.

Really top notch Task Committees can say "We need 20 pilots into goal today for maximum points value ... or we need (say) 50% into goal for this task.
- and the "good uns" will, every time, get 7 - 9 or 49 to 51% into goal (yes, exaggerating a bit but.. you get my drift.) Awesome neat stuff. High science. Hats off to 'em.

1. One of the first lessons I was taught (by Robin Peterson) is that you can fly in Zero air until they have to fly a pine coffin up to plant you in.
Zero Air means you are in air that is rising at the same as your sink rate. It may be building into a better thermal.

- So do the best scratching of your life if need be. Really stay in anything useable, really stay away from anything sinking as best you can.
Don't go searching away from zero lift for anything better unless you are pretty sure to find it.

2. When you find a thermal, center in it and try to turn as smoothly and cleanly as you can so the event team can easily figure out its strength and wind drift.

3. When you get high enough to complete the following maneauver, fly a box for say 30 seconds each leg so the pilots and Task Committee can get a fix on wind direction and speed.

So your "square" box ends up visually to those below looking like this:

= Start
|
|
|
|
|
|
| . . . . .End=> ___________________|
| . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . |
| . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . |
| . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . |
| . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . |
| _______________________________|


Then repeat flying the box at significantly different altitudes, using much longer timed legs to ensure what you are doing is clearly understood and understandable.

4. When you lose a thermal 99% of the time it is because you have lost the thermal.
There has been a wind speed and / or direction shift... a shear or inversion.
We all see days when the expert pilots are thousands of feet above the rest. They know how to do it.
Fly four directions of the compass to re-find it, tanking up in the thermal you came up in until you do.

Part 2:
For the rest of these Wind Teck duties it is best / required to have a Radio on the RACE Frequency.

Use the RACE Frequency to feed the pilots, Task Committee and Event Directors with information about such things as:
1. The altitude where you notice a rapid decrease (or increase) in temperature;
2. A significant change in wind speed and / or direction
3. Shears or Inverions.
4. The altitude where you notice a rapid decrease (or increase) in termal velocity.
5. The altitude where you notice a rapid decrease (or increase) in turbulence.
etc.

Part 3:

Known Experts who also have expert knowledge of the area may be asked to fly the entire task route ahead of time.
This to look over and get a good feel for known turbulence areas.
* Level 2 or Level 3 alerts may cause the Task Committee to change the task route to avoid such areas.

Finally:
Thermals (and the Cumulous clouds they often create) are our gas stations in the sky.
You will be directed to land at a specific time at a location away from the Task Course.

This is to ensure that some competitor(s) do not get an unfair advantage by "tanking up" in your thermal.
This can result in a protest that can disqualify the day... and sometimes that is the day that is required for a valid meet to be counted.

_____________________________

*
A Level 1 alert is that all is fine.
A Level 2 alert is that conditions are marginal for your experience and comfort level, or conditions are building.
A Level 3 alert is that conditions are beyond comfortable for you and you are intending to land.
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